100+ Elements of a Great Landing Page

Digital marketers, we’ve all been there: The ad campaign is thriving. The CPC is low. Like, dirt cheap low. The client is thrilled, ups their spend 5, 10, 20x.

And then, all of a sudden, nothing. No leads.

What’s the secret to getting a marketing campaign from prospects to leads? A great landing page.

Headline Tips

  • Address a pain point or benefit, right off the bat. Why do people benefit from this? Or, alternatively, what pain do they avoid by signing up for this?
    • Should clearly tell people why they want to buy or opt-in. 
    • This is not a time to be shy.
  • Video can be compelling, but it needs to be 60-120 seconds, and draw people in to proceed with the next step (buy or sign up). It cannot be merely descriptive.
  • If a video cannot be done succinctly and with the highest of quality, it is best to go with no video at all.

Imagery

  • Should be on-brand. Should immediately evoke 3 feeling-based tenets of the brand.
  • Logo should NOT be a hyperlink back to the main site. Keep people on the page. 
  • Avoid stock photography, when possible. 
  • White space helps viewers navigate a page.
  • Faces and photography tend to perform better than other types of images.
  • If you offer different varieties of a single product (i.e., sizes, colors, types), a minimum of 3-5 varieties offered and in stock should be shown on the landing page.
  • Imagery should grab attention, but not hold attention. Viewers should be enticed enough to stay on the page and read text, not examine the image closely. 
  • Coupons or discount codes can be used, but primarily for lower-cost items. A “$20 off” coupon for food encourages a customer to take action. A “$1000 off” coupon for professional services makes a viewer question how much the service costs, if it’s truly worth it, and a slew of other questions you don’t want them asking pre-demo or pre-consultation.
  • Coupon or discount codes are best used when the original price is also listed. Again, lower prices tend to do better with this strategy. Higher-priced products and services are best left to mention price after a consultation, demo, and/or discussion.
  • Visual elements should point to the form you want people to fill out or the button you want people to click. 
  • A countdown clock, or number remaining in stock, can create a sense of urgency, if it is on-brand.

Copy

  • Bullets are best.
  • Landing pages with 5-10 sections tend to perform the best.
  • Keeping landing pages simple, to 100 words or less per section, is best.
  • Simple iconography, telling features in a clear one-word headline, with bulleted descriptions underneath, can be cogent to explain how a product/service/company works or its benefits to the user.
  • Accreditations, ratings, and compliments are great to display prominently. Social proof is increasingly more important in today’s online marketplace.
  • Time can be a compelling sell. If your product takes less than 30 days to work, say so. If your service can be transformational in 90 days, say so. 
  • Avoid talking about competitors. There is a time and a place to explain the benefits of your product versus competitors, but when someone is visiting your landing page via an ad in his or her spare time, they are likely to be passively buying and/or learning information. This is not a great time to get them to think about your competitors. 
  • Avoid fine print. Don’t give people an excuse to bookmark and come back to it later. Make it clear — it’s now or never. Get them to sign up, download, or buy.
  • Particularly for services, avoid long blocks of text. Again, the landing page is simply to inform, not to truly connect. The goal is to get people to want to learn more and to the next step, not to necessarily buy a four-figure or higher product or service. 

Offers

  • Free offers are always great, if you can manage them. Things like a downloadable e-guide or white paper.
  • The next best are free trial offers. Casper, the ultra-modern mattress company, offers a 100-night free offer.

Buttons/Calls to Actions (CTAs)

  • This is obvious, but the button should stand out from the background color. At best, it should be a tertiary or even a quaternary color, standing out completely from the rest of the page.
  • Don’t offer a button without telling people why they should click on it, and what comes next. 
    • If it’s a buy page next, have “shop now.” (The word “now” is particularly potent.)
    • If it’s a descriptor page, have the button say, “Learn more.” 
    • If you’re offering a free downloadable e-guide, show people screenshots of the actual report. Bonus points if they can actually read excerpts of valuable information from the report.
    • Don’t mislead, or people will be jarred and fall off the site entirely. 
    • Avoid vague terms like “Get started today” or “Submit” that don’t indicate whether or not that means you’re purchasing next or going to be led through a myriad of forms. 
    • The best buttons say “Get me my money-saving tips NOW!” or “Yes, I want to look younger in 30 days! Go!” Make it a button that is fun and affirming to click.
  • If you’re offering a form, it should be simple and easy to fill out. No more than 3-5 fields should have to be filled out, or else someone will conclude it’s not worth their time, or, worse yet, decide to “do it later” (code for “never” in today’s busy world).
  • Avoid more than one call to action per landing page. You can ask twice, and have two buttons, but they should do the same thing/perform the same action. 

Within Forms

  • Do not use fading gray labels within the form fields. They have a tendency to make people exit more than blank forms.

Going the Extra Mile

  • If the product or service appeals to people who are 60+, these demographics still consistently prefer phone to email or text-based chat. Offer a phone number with quality customer service on the other end. 
  • A privacy policy, listed at the bottom of the page and not linking elsewhere, can be reassuring to users that when they submit their information, you will not be selling it to third parties.
  • Social media buttons on the bottom of the page give people too many ways out of your page without buying or becoming a lead. Avoid these at all costs.
  • Navigation links away from one of two major actions (buy now or sign up to become a lead) are dangerous. This includes links to the primary site, FAQ page, blog, etc. Proceed with caution. 

Bottom Line

If you want top-notch digital marketing strategy, or have questions about your own keyword ranking strategy, reach out to us at AEK Solutions for a free, no-obligation Q&A session. AEK Solutions is dedicated to creating new sources of repeatable growth online by embracing a rapid-experimentation, funnel-based approach. We also utilize creative and technology, such as geotargeting, customer experience management, and moments of influence testing to develop solutions to specific digital marketing issues.

100+ Elements of a Great Landing Page

Digital marketers, we’ve all been there: The ad campaign is thriving. The CPC is low. Like, dirt cheap low. The client is thrilled, ups their spend 5, 10, 20x.

And then, all of a sudden, nothing. No leads.

What’s the secret to getting a marketing campaign from prospects to leads? A great landing page.

Headline Tips

  • Address a pain point or benefit, right off the bat. Why do people benefit from this? Or, alternatively, what pain do they avoid by signing up for this?
    • Should clearly tell people why they want to buy or opt-in. 
    • This is not a time to be shy.
  • Video can be compelling, but it needs to be 60-120 seconds, and draw people in to proceed with the next step (buy or sign up). It cannot be merely descriptive.
  • If a video cannot be done succinctly and with the highest of quality, it is best to go with no video at all.

Imagery

  • Should be on-brand. Should immediately evoke 3 feeling-based tenets of the brand.
  • Logo should NOT be a hyperlink back to the main site. Keep people on the page. 
  • Avoid stock photography, when possible. 
  • White space helps viewers navigate a page.
  • Faces and photography tend to perform better than other types of images.
  • If you offer different varieties of a single product (i.e., sizes, colors, types), a minimum of 3-5 varieties offered and in stock should be shown on the landing page.
  • Imagery should grab attention, but not hold attention. Viewers should be enticed enough to stay on the page and read text, not examine the image closely. 
  • Coupons or discount codes can be used, but primarily for lower-cost items. A “$20 off” coupon for food encourages a customer to take action. A “$1000 off” coupon for professional services makes a viewer question how much the service costs, if it’s truly worth it, and a slew of other questions you don’t want them asking pre-demo or pre-consultation.
  • Coupon or discount codes are best used when the original price is also listed. Again, lower prices tend to do better with this strategy. Higher-priced products and services are best left to mention price after a consultation, demo, and/or discussion.
  • Visual elements should point to the form you want people to fill out or the button you want people to click. 
  • A countdown clock, or number remaining in stock, can create a sense of urgency, if it is on-brand.

Copy

  • Bullets are best.
  • Landing pages with 5-10 sections tend to perform the best.
  • Keeping landing pages simple, to 100 words or less per section, is best.
  • Simple iconography, telling features in a clear one-word headline, with bulleted descriptions underneath, can be cogent to explain how a product/service/company works or its benefits to the user.
  • Accreditations, ratings, and compliments are great to display prominently. Social proof is increasingly more important in today’s online marketplace.
  • Time can be a compelling sell. If your product takes less than 30 days to work, say so. If your service can be transformational in 90 days, say so. 
  • Avoid talking about competitors. There is a time and a place to explain the benefits of your product versus competitors, but when someone is visiting your landing page via an ad in his or her spare time, they are likely to be passively buying and/or learning information. This is not a great time to get them to think about your competitors. 
  • Avoid fine print. Don’t give people an excuse to bookmark and come back to it later. Make it clear — it’s now or never. Get them to sign up, download, or buy.
  • Particularly for services, avoid long blocks of text. Again, the landing page is simply to inform, not to truly connect. The goal is to get people to want to learn more and to the next step, not to necessarily buy a four-figure or higher product or service. 

Offers

  • Free offers are always great, if you can manage them. Things like a downloadable e-guide or white paper.
  • The next best are free trial offers. Casper, the ultra-modern mattress company, offers a 100-night free offer.

Buttons/Calls to Actions (CTAs)

  • This is obvious, but the button should stand out from the background color. At best, it should be a tertiary or even a quaternary color, standing out completely from the rest of the page.
  • Don’t offer a button without telling people why they should click on it, and what comes next. 
    • If it’s a buy page next, have “shop now.” (The word “now” is particularly potent.)
    • If it’s a descriptor page, have the button say, “Learn more.” 
    • If you’re offering a free downloadable e-guide, show people screenshots of the actual report. Bonus points if they can actually read excerpts of valuable information from the report.
    • Don’t mislead, or people will be jarred and fall off the site entirely. 
    • Avoid vague terms like “Get started today” or “Submit” that don’t indicate whether or not that means you’re purchasing next or going to be led through a myriad of forms. 
    • The best buttons say “Get me my money-saving tips NOW!” or “Yes, I want to look younger in 30 days! Go!” Make it a button that is fun and affirming to click.
  • If you’re offering a form, it should be simple and easy to fill out. No more than 3-5 fields should have to be filled out, or else someone will conclude it’s not worth their time, or, worse yet, decide to “do it later” (code for “never” in today’s busy world).
  • Avoid more than one call to action per landing page. You can ask twice, and have two buttons, but they should do the same thing/perform the same action. 

Within Forms

  • Do not use fading gray labels within the form fields. They have a tendency to make people exit more than blank forms.

Going the Extra Mile

  • If the product or service appeals to people who are 60+, these demographics still consistently prefer phone to email or text-based chat. Offer a phone number with quality customer service on the other end. 
  • A privacy policy, listed at the bottom of the page and not linking elsewhere, can be reassuring to users that when they submit their information, you will not be selling it to third parties.
  • Social media buttons on the bottom of the page give people too many ways out of your page without buying or becoming a lead. Avoid these at all costs.
  • Navigation links away from one of two major actions (buy now or sign up to become a lead) are dangerous. This includes links to the primary site, FAQ page, blog, etc. Proceed with caution. 

Bottom Line

If you want top-notch digital marketing strategy, or have questions about your own keyword ranking strategy, reach out to us at AEK Solutions for a free, no-obligation Q&A session. AEK Solutions is dedicated to creating new sources of repeatable growth online by embracing a rapid-experimentation, funnel-based approach. We also utilize creative and technology, such as geotargeting, customer experience management, and moments of influence testing to develop solutions to specific digital marketing issues.